JSC "VEI GEO"
COMMERCIALIZATION OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

НА РУССКОМ ЯЗЫКЕ

Main

Presentation

Convective drying

Istra Micro HPP Flaw detector
South Sudan Lao RusHydro Guyana Amur Dagneft
Vietnam Mozambique Philippines Burkina Faso Tanzania Archeology
Dagestan Guinea Cameroon Armenia Booryatiya Ozonation

 

EXPLORATION&MINING CONSORTIUM

 

We were offered by the government of the Republic of South Sudan to take a part in  exploitation and supplementary exploration of the mineral deposits such as: oilfields, gold, diamonds, manganese, nickel, chrome, copper, uranium, iron ore etc. We will provide services on the supplementary exploration of mineral deposits applying our ground-penetrating technology. As a payment for our services representatives of Southern Sudan offer us to establish a Joint Venture and where mineral deposits at our option would be transferred. The Ministry of Petroleum and Mining will own 30% of shares of the Joint Venture, rest 70% will belong to Russian part. We are ready to consider an opportunity to participate in that Partnership Project.

After 1-year discussions, Southern Sudan National Assembly (SSNA) finally approved «South Sudan Mining Bill 2012» at the fourth reading. This law governs relationships between investors and  provides taxis in a range of 2% - 3% of the value of mined mineral resources. A meeting with members of  the Government of the Republic of South Sudan and the Ambassador  of Southern Sudan in Russian Federation was held in Moscow on February 13, 2013.  

 

 

  

 

 

SOUTH SUDAN – WIKIPEDIA INFO

The population of Southern Sudan is around 7.5-13 Mio. In 2008 the census counted the Southern Sudan population at 8.26 million . However, the census results of Southern Sudan were rejected by Southern Sudanese officials on reported grounds that "the central bureau of statistics in Khartoum refused to share the national Sudan raw census data with the southern Sudan centre for census, statistics and evaluation. Most population of South Sudan is of Negroid race and practice mainly indigenous traditional beliefs, although some practice Christianity.  The major ethnic groups present in South Sudan are the Dinka, the Nuer, the Bari, and the Azande. The Shilluk constitute a historically influential state along the White Nile, and their language is fairly closely related to Dinka and Nuer. The traditional territories of the Shilluk and the Northeastern Dinka are adjacent.

 

LANGUAGES

 

The official language of South Sudan is English.  There are over 60 indigenous languages spoken in South Sudan. Most of the indigenous languages are classified under the Nilo-Saharan language family; collectively, they represent two of the first order divisions of Nilo-Saharan (Eastern Sudanic and Central Sudanic). The remainder belong to the Ubangi languages of the Niger–Congo language family, and they are spoken in the southwest. The most recent available population statistics for many South Sudan indigenous languages go back to the 1980s. Since then, the war of independence led to many civilian deaths and massive displacement of refugees to Sudan and beyond. Due to the drafting of colonial borders in Africa by European powers during the 19th and 20th centuries, some indigenous languages of South Sudan are spoken in neighboring countries, in some cases more so than in South Sudan. Zande, for example is estimated to have twice as many speakers in the neighboring Democratic Republic of the Congo, while the Banda group of languages may have more speakers in the Central African Republic than in South Sudan. In South Sudan, the languages with the most speakers are Nuer with 740,000 speakers in 1982, and Dinka sociolinguistic language or dialect continuum with perhaps 1.4 million in 1986; these two groups of languages are also closely related to one another. Bari had 420,000 in 2000, and Zande had 350,000 in 1982. Of the Ubangi languages, available figures indicate that Zande is the only one with a substantial number of speakers in South Sudan.

 

In the state of Western Bahr Al Ghazal, in its border region with the neighboring country of Sudan, there is an indeterminate number of Baggara Arabs—a traditionally nomadic people—that resides either seasonally or permanently. Their language is Chadian Arabic and their traditional territories are in the southern portions of the Sudanese regions of Kordofan and Darfur. In the capital, Juba, there are several thousand people who use an Arabic pidgin, Juba Arabic. Since South Sudan was part of Sudan for a century, some South Sudanese are conversant in either Sudanese Arabic or Modern Standard Arabic.

 

During the Rejaf Conference held in April 1928 during the Anglo-Egyptian condominium it was decided that schooling in the South would be in the English language. Although since independence the government tried to replace English with Arabic, part of the peace agreement in 1972 ensured that English continued as the medium of education in most schools in southern Sudan. English is widely spoken by those who have had the opportunity of going to school, either within South Sudan or in the diaspora.

 

South Sudan's ambassador to Kenya said on 2 August 2011 that Swahili will be introduced in South Sudan with the goal of supplanting Arabic as a lingua franca, in keeping with the country's intention of orientation toward the East African Community rather than Sudan and the Arab League.

A group of South Sudanese refugees who were raised in Cuba during the Sudanese wars, numbering about 600, also speak fluent Spanish. They have been named the Cubanos, and most had settled in Juba by the time of the country's independence.

Between 9 and 15 January 2011, a referendum was held to determine whether South Sudan should declare independence from Sudan. 98.83% of the population voted for independence. (The results for that referendum were released on 30 January 2011.) Those living in the north and expatriates living overseas also voted. This led to a formal independence on 9 July, although certain disputes still remain, such as sharing of the oil revenues, as an estimated 80% of the oil in the nation is secured from South Sudan, which would represent amazing economic potential for one of the world's most deprived areas. The region of Abyei still remains disputed and a separate referendum will be held in Abyei on whether they want to join Sudan or South Sudan. The South Kordofan conflict broke out in June 2011 between the Army of Sudan and the SPLA over the Nuba Mountains.

South Sudan is at war with at least seven armed groups in 9 of its 10 states, with tens of thousands displaced.The fighters accuse the government of plotting to stay in power indefinitely, not fairly representing and supporting all tribal groups while neglecting development in rural areas. Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) also operates in a wide area that includes South Sudan.

Inter-ethnic warfare that in some cases predates the war of independence is widespread. In December 2011, tribal clashes in Jonglei intensified between the Nuer White Army of the Lou Nuer and the Murle. The White Army warned it would wipe out the Murle and would also fight South Sudanese and UN forces sent to the area around Pibor.

In March 2012, South Sudanese forces seized the Heglig oil fields in lands claimed by both Sudan and South Sudan in the province of South Kordofan after conflict with Sudanese forces in the South Sudanese state of Unity. South Sudan withdrew on 20 March, and the Sudanese Army entered Heglig two days later.

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

  

 

  

Main

Presentation

Convective drying

Istra Micro HPP Flaw detector
South Sudan Lao RusHydro Guyana Amur Dagneft
Vietnam Mozambique Philippines Burkina Faso Tanzania Archeology
Dagestan Guinea Cameroon Armenia Booryatiya Ozonation